Teachers Guide to Effective Sentence Writing (What Works for Special-Needs Learners)


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What Parents Can Do to Nurture Good Writers

I appreciate your adding this extra nuance to that point. Any chance you can find another book to recommend? That is a LOT. Much more reasonable. Yes Vera, I know. I have had others comment on this as well. I am going to look for an alternative! Thanks, Laurie! This article is so helpful! Thank you for sharing. I am a college student about to start my student teaching. I am currently observing various teachers in my local middle school. It is a small town public school that has little to no diversity.

This year they received their first student with no English background. There is no ESL teacher and from what I have seen, he gets no content ahead of time and the use of his first language is often discouraged. He is fully mainstream and is pulled out for about 20 minutes every other day to practice English vocabulary colors, body parts, etc. In Language Arts, he has a reading book and grammar workbook in his native language, but is given spelling words such as shirt, pants, big, little, and asked to read books on a first or second grade level to practice his English comprehension.

In math, science, and history, he just sits in class. Google Translate is used to interpret some assignments, but that is about the extent of his instruction. I have worked with the student some and he is a very smart kid and picks up on things quickly. Being around him and observing him in class, I get the feeling that he is bored and is annoyed with the English vocabulary drills. Again, thank you for sharing,. I love these suggestions. Or defend it. Thank you, Janet. Same for English-speaking Muslim students, Hispanic students, Asian students….

Most importantly it was broken down into simplistic terms for a non-ESL teacher. I hope to take it back and I have colleagues here the podcast and understand that most importantly it is important to collaborate and use these 12 strategies as a guideline. I have been teaching for 18 years in a Hispanic neighborhood and usually only knew how to pronounce a students first name. This article has made me realize that it is a sign of respect. I never thought of it like that. I am going to make a conscious effort to know and memorize the first and last name of each student in my classroom.

You have change my point of view regarding this topic. Thank you. Although, my students know that it is difficult to memorize all the last names, that is no excuse. I know that I can do better and I will do better from now on due to your article! I really like what you are doing. Please keep sharing these ideas with teachers. It is essential that we share and reflect on how we approach our profession.

I appreciate your hard work and look forward to hearing more of your ideas. This is so wonderful that I am going to share it with teachers in our school that works with ESL students. Thanks ever so much. It is so powerful and resourceful to especially international teachers who travels to poor countries across the ocean where resources are not easy to find.

What a helpful article! My favourite tip is number twelve. Supporting opportunities for practice and social exchanges between ELL students and their same-age peers is something that I value in my practice as a Speech Language Pathologist. My colleague in the field of special education and I plan integration activities for our ELL special education students with students in the community preschool program.

This exposes them to peer role models and group practice in activities featuring age-level vocabulary and langue concepts. I teach a self-contained, developmentally delayed preschool classroom. This article was very helpful for me because I am doing an assignment that is based on differentiated instruction and has something to do with ESL learners and what are different ways to teach them and meet there needs.

Dear ladies and gents, In Canada, I could borrow this book with ease from one of our public libraries. I would imagine that in the US, your library services would be the same. Thank you Jennifer for some great tips, quite useful as am a French language teacher, with smatterings of ESL teaching via Skype.

Bruce Saddler

All suggestions can be used or adapted in all forms of teaching. Hi, Jenny! Again, you produce great content that is immediately implementable! As a teacher of English learners ELs , these ideas are very appropriate practices.

Advice for a First Grade Teacher : Lesson Plans for Teachers

The two pratices that I like the most in this list are 1 and 2. I use group work to help ELs develop reading, speaking, and critical thinking skills. The process is called Visible Reading. I model the process of deconstructing comolex texts. Then, I let students practice that skill in small pairs. Finally, we compare our ideas as a whole class to clarify misunderstandings. I hope it helps your readers strategically use group work to develop reading, speaking, and thinking skills in an enagung way.

All of these are excellent strategies for supporting ELLs. From day one one students are in our schools to learn content AND language. If we think of our students even in just the first year as being there to learn English and absorb some language as if they were auditing our class then we are doing a major disservice to them. The whole point of these strategies is to make content comprehensible so that students can access the content. Use of home language L1 becomes a huge asset here.

Assessment

I have been reading this blog for quite a while, so I know that it is not the feeling of the author that students should just sit in class and listen, but the wording used here was very unfortunate. Thanks for sharing your thoughts. If you have links to resources that can help schools better serve newcomers, I would love for you to share them with us!

Most of them drop out. Rips my heart out that my district blatantly refuses to support these students. This article is spot on. These are the very things I teach our content area teachers. I think I may just use this article as a resource for them next school year. Hi, thank you for this post, which has been really useful for me to think about in relation to teaching ELL students!

One minor thing I wanted to offer here is that El Salvador and Honduras are in what is typically considered to be Central America, and not South America. Every college today has a classroom, which allows students to enhance and maintain their day to day English language learning development. Their required daily journal, will reflect those students whom are able to grow in that practice.

What a fantastic article! I live and work in southern China going on 8 years now and use many of these tactics. All of my students are ELL some speak three or more languages and kind support goes a long way.

The Guide to 1st Grade | Scholastic | Parents

I often tell my students to use a dictionary to look up words and I have them do pre-work in their first language then, change it over to English. Most of my students speak Mandarin Chinese and there are times that I will make a fun joke or help them with vocabulary in this language. Although many people have different ideas about this, I have noticed it has helped me build strong student-teacher relationships and I am learning more and more everyday about the many cultures here. Thank you for another great article!

Is there a good place to look for a master list of sentence frames from step 7? I am stressing academic language in discussion with freshman and would love to give them a resource.

Tier Two Strategies

Hi Chris! I found a few free downloads that may work. Thanks for this article, Jennifer. By providing sentence starters and sentence frames, guiding the discussion, and allowing the use of translators in the classroom, ELLs can contribute almost immediately. Hi Rochelle! Thanks for taking the time to come over here and post this. I would love to hear what other teachers of English learners think about this.

A month? The supports you listed sound like the kinds of things that could get students comfortable more quickly without undue stress. However, I would like to weigh in on this conversation. I agree with both of your opinions and personally do not feel there is one exact answer but rather a case-by-case approach should be taken. Let me explain a couple of things that I do every day in my third grade classroom.

Often this is one of the few times in the day I can clearly understand them and everyone can hear them! I, of course have the universal sign of approval on, a HUGE smile. I also do a formal morning meeting in a circle, one portion of the meeting is, each student sharing out a response to a question that I have posed. In addition, I taught an ELL this year that had already attended school in my building for months in second grade.


  • The Blow Go Bar.
  • Kill The Blackbird.
  • The Guide to 1st Grade?
  • The Story of Cupid and Psyche;
  • Teacher's Guide to Effective Sentence Writing by Bruce Saddler;
  • The Parts Left Out: A Novel (The Karnac Library).

So for this situation I spoke with the student privately and also gave mom a call discussing how it was time to start speaking in English. Thank goodness mom and I both agreed that we would push on the student a bit more forcefully which we both did in our respective locations. I also made sure to have this student sit next to someone who would support interpret him as needed. Finally, this particular student loved math and did very well in the subject. I would be sure to get him speaking and praise him often during math which helped boost his confidence.

This eventually with time began to transfer in to writing and oral reading comprehension. In summation, I feel each student must be taken on a case-by-case basis, draw on the area s the student excels and boost their confidence at every chance you can and hopefully with tender loving care that confidence will transfer to the areas where they struggle more with English. Final note, my school does not have a designated ELL teacher to partner with.

Thank you for all these tips and reminders. I am an ESL tutor for grades 1 and 2 and I know these modifications will help all our learners and will benefit our classroom teachers so much! This was a powerful post i really enjoyed reading it. I was able to gain a lot of knowledge about how i can be more helpful to my future ELL students. I think its important that we are aware of what methods to use because all of our students learn in different ways. Having visuals was a great idea not only for ELL students but for all students who may be visual learners. Does anyone know of a good ELL professional development opportunity to send general education teachers to?

It could be over the summer, an online program, an annual conference — anything. Hopefully others who see your comment will be able to jump in and offer some ideas. Developed by the author team of Dr. MaryEllen Vogt, and Dr. Great article. I really like how you pointed out how we can systematically work with general Ed teachers to support the content.

When the woman mentioned chatting with teachers I thought that was good, but… But then the next paragraph talks about the systmeitizimg. I keep trying to build those relationships everyday. I love the recommendation on helping ESL students take themselves less seriously.


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Too often, I find that students are afraid of making the smallest mistakes. Teaching them some humor can lift their anxiety. I absolutely loved your podcast. I am a teacher and honestly this is the first podcast I have ever listened to. I loved it. Thank you for sharing your interviews! Students need to be provided with structured opportunities to acquire relevant writing skills, such as spelling and handwriting, as well as effective writing processes, such as sentence and text structure. The materials guide teachers through the relevant aspects of writing, how to assess these aspects, including downloadable checklists and forms , and effective strategies to address difficulties, providing models and examples.

The personal information captured in this form is used for the sole purpose of sharing this page. It will not be stored, used or disclosed by NESA for any other purpose, unless it is authorised by law. Web Content Viewer Display content menu Display portlet menu. Media Releases. News Stories. Official Notices. Writing Display content menu Display portlet menu. Spelling, handwriting and punctuation skills Knowledge of sentence and text structure Writing processes Assessment Gathering evidence of learning What aspects of literacy are necessary as students learn to write? Phonemic awareness Letter—sound relationships Word parts and whole words Spelling fluency Handwriting Sentence structure Vocabulary Knowledge of text types What knowledge, skills and strategies may need further investigation?

What assessment strategies can I use to investigate particular aspects of writing?

Teachers Guide to Effective Sentence Writing (What Works for Special-Needs Learners) Teachers Guide to Effective Sentence Writing (What Works for Special-Needs Learners)
Teachers Guide to Effective Sentence Writing (What Works for Special-Needs Learners) Teachers Guide to Effective Sentence Writing (What Works for Special-Needs Learners)
Teachers Guide to Effective Sentence Writing (What Works for Special-Needs Learners) Teachers Guide to Effective Sentence Writing (What Works for Special-Needs Learners)
Teachers Guide to Effective Sentence Writing (What Works for Special-Needs Learners) Teachers Guide to Effective Sentence Writing (What Works for Special-Needs Learners)
Teachers Guide to Effective Sentence Writing (What Works for Special-Needs Learners) Teachers Guide to Effective Sentence Writing (What Works for Special-Needs Learners)
Teachers Guide to Effective Sentence Writing (What Works for Special-Needs Learners) Teachers Guide to Effective Sentence Writing (What Works for Special-Needs Learners)
Teachers Guide to Effective Sentence Writing (What Works for Special-Needs Learners) Teachers Guide to Effective Sentence Writing (What Works for Special-Needs Learners)

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